Image for post
Image for post

Whenever you hear something repeated, it feels more true when you hear it repeated. In other words, repetition makes any statement seem more true. So anything you hear will feel more true each time you hear it again.

Do you see what I did there? Each of the three sentences above conveyed the same message. Yet each time you read the next sentence, it felt more and more true. Cognitive neuroscientists like myself call this the “illusory truth effect.”

Go back and recall your experience reading the first sentence. It probably felt strange and disconcerting, perhaps with a tone of outrage, as in “I don’t believe things more if they’re repeated!” …


You can protect your work and life from the significant possibility of an election disaster by treating preparation for this likelihood as insurance. That’s the key take-away message of this episode of the Wise Decision Maker Show, which describes how to manage election disaster risk.

Video: “How to Manage Election Disaster Risk”

Podcast: “How to Manage Election Disaster Risk”

Links Mentioned in Videocast and Podcast

  • Here’s the article on How to Manage Election Disaster Risk
  • The book Never Go With Your Gut: How Pioneering Leaders Make the Best Decisions and Avoid Business Disasters is available here
  • You are welcome to register for the free Wise Decision Maker Course

Transcript

Hello, everyone, and welcome to another episode of the wise decision maker show where we help you make the wisest and most profitable decisions. …


Image for post
Image for post

Have you ever felt unhappy about a purchase you made despite spending hours reading product descriptions and reviews, comparing dozens of options, and finally choosing what you perceived to be the best deal? I faced the same problem many years ago, when I still lacked the knowledge of effective shopping techniques around buying choices.

We make shopping mistakes because of how our brain is wired and because retailers use human psychology to their advantage by manipulating the shopping process, particularly in digital contexts. Amazon and other retailers want us to spend as much time as possible on their websites to tempt us with a variety of add-ons and options and to cause us FOMO (fear of missing out) on the best possible deal. …


Company cultures and top leaders may unconsciously penalize subordinates who bring them bad news. This dangerous judgment error is called the MUM effect and it creates an atmosphere of secrecy that leads successful companies to stagnate and deteriorate. That’s the key take-away message of this episode of the Wise Decision Maker Show, which describes the danger of missing vital information due to the MUM Effect.

Video: “Are You Missing Vital Information Due to the MUM Effect?”

Podcast: “Are You Missing Vital Information Due to the MUM Effect?”

Links Mentioned in Videocast and Podcast


Image for post
Image for post

What risks will you face in your work and life if the US Presidential election results in an election disaster, such as a constitutional crisis and widespread civil unrest?

That question may sound unreal to you. Yet it doesn’t sound so far-fetched to many political leaders and experts observing the run-up to the election. Indeed, major political players are reshaping their strategies and investing substantial time and money to prepare for the likelihood of this scenario.

If you enjoy video, here’s a videocast based on this blog:

And if you like audio, here’s a podcast based on the blog:


Image for post
Image for post

The COVID-19 pandemic has upended our routines and lifestyles. While being shut mostly in your home or observing infection prevention guidelines when leaving the house, chances are you might be finding it difficult to adapt to the changes of the past few months. And yet, we all have to find a way to survive and thrive in the pandemic.

Liz, a coaching client of mine, had a difficult time adjusting to the COVID-19 reality. As an executive in the insurance industry, she thrived in her fast-paced but very organized work schedule and equally full social life. …


Image for post
Image for post

Why do you buy what you buy? Are your purchases for the right reasons? Research shows that people overestimate their logical decision-making when purchasing, and instead make many irrational choices in their shopping. We think we shop based on our self-directed goals. In reality, we are shaped very strongly by our external context: the environment crafted by advertisements and salespeople, as well as website and store layouts.

People overestimate their ability to keep their impulses in check, a tendency that behavioral economists and neuroscientists call restraint bias. …


In order to prevent conflicts across age divides, organizations need to avoid dangerous judgment errors. That’s the key take-away message of this episode of the Wise Decision Maker Show.

Video: “How to Prevent Conflicts Across Age Divides”

Podcast: “How to Prevent Conflicts Across Age Divides”

Links Mentioned in Video and Podcast

Transcript

Hello everyone, and welcome to another episode of the Wise Decision Maker Show, we are going to talk about young people today and how to engage with them effectively. …


Image for post
Image for post

Strong relationships with your organization’s stakeholders will go a long way in helping you forecast and identify problems, as well as formulate and roll out effective solutions. …


Image for post
Image for post

As the vast majority of companies rush to reopen, they’re falling into the trap of “getting back to normal.” They’re not realizing we’re heading into a period of waves of restrictions once again, due to many states reopening too soon. Indeed, some of the states to open early onward have already reimposed some restrictions, showing that as I predicted way back at the start of the pandemic, we will be facing rolling waves of restrictions and shutdowns, and need to focus much more on virtual interactions.

We need to realize that the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the way companies and organizations — big or small — operate. Organizations have to find a way to survive and thrive in this new abnormal, so it’s important for leadership teams to do a reality check regularly. To do so, we need to understand the parallels between what’s going on now, and what happened at the start of the pandemic. …

About

Dr. Gleb Tsipursky

Best-selling author, consultant, coach, speaker on #decisionmaking and #leadership; CEO, Disaster Avoidance Experts http://disasteravoidanceexperts.com/

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store